So here are my Cormo samples.  All of these samples have been washed using the tulle sausage method that I learned from my spinning teacher eons ago and she learned from Margaret Stove’s Spinning Fine Wools book.

I like this method of washing wools I want to flick because it keeps all of the locks aligned and organized and though it is more work at the beginning the spinning prep can go really fast.

Cormo is my favorite of the fine wools for a few reasons.  First, I love the crimp on this wool.  Similar to Merino but even more…hard to describe.

Second, the length of lock is fantastic.  Lots of these fleeces come in at 4-5 inches.  I like to call it the Longwool of the fine wools:-)

And third, this wool is not readily available as a processed fiber.  If you really want it you either have to pay a ton of money for it or process it yourself.  It also need a lot of care in the processing because it can get neppy really easily so I am forced to take my time with it.

so now you want to know about the samples?
From bottom of the photo to the top:
3 Ply Sample was spun worsted (short forward draw)  – 15 wpi
2 Ply Sample was spun worsted (short forward draw)  – 15 wpi
2 Ply Sample was spun worsted to a fine laceweight  – 24 wpi  (32 wpi before washing)
3 Ply Sample was spun woollen long draw  – 9 wpi
3 Ply Sample was spun from the fold -10 wpi
(Click to biggy the photo)

Every single sample was flicked  and spun from the cut end of the lock (except the one that was spun from the fold).  Again I am thrilled with the samples.  Every one of them has a wonderful natural elasticity to it which would make any knit or woven garment comfortable.
The lace weight sample I could imagine as an undershirt or other close to the skin item that should also be warm.

Currently in the works is Corriedale.

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